A picture of a report card with marijuana leaves

A strong correlation between adolescents experimenting with drugs and alcohol and their overall academic success has been investigated in several studies. Here is what every parent should know.

Despite the best efforts of legislators and the various drug awareness programs, experimentation with drugs and alcohol reminds high amongst young people. One survey found that by late adolescence, 78.2% of all adolescents had tried alcohol, while 42.5% had tried drugs.

While some may write this off as just a phase amongst young people, researchers paint a A picture of a teacher handing out grades with an Fmuch different picture of the ramifications on academic achievement that drug use causes. Here we break down some of these studies.

What effect does drug use have on adolescent’s school grades?

In 2009, the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey sought to investigate the impact that drug and alcohol use amongst high school students had on their academic achievements. The survey used a straightforward approach by grouping each student by their grades, and providing the percentage of them that used drugs or alcohol.

The results clearly showed that drug and alcohol use was correlated with poor academic performance. For example, 62% of students with D’s and F’s reported current alcohol use, versus 32% of A students.

The same trend was shown for marijuana, with 48% of D’s/F’s students reporting use versus 10% of A students. These results became even more lopsided with stronger narcotics.

What effect does drug use have on adolescent’s long-term outlook on school?

A 2003 study published in the Journal of Research on Adolescence investigated how drug and alcohol use amongst youth related to their attitude, behavior, and success in academics.

The study found a strong correlation with misbehaving at school and drug use. The study also found that adolescent drug use corresponded with lack of interest in school, lack of motivation to succeed in school, and poor academic achievement in the long-term.

Final Note

This article is intended for those considering a new way of life, free of the pain of drug and alcohol addiction. For more information on recovery and anyone seeking help with addiction and substance abuse problems, please call True Recovery at (844) 744-8783 or visit us online.