A man is partying on drugs

Prescription amphetamines, such as Adderall, Ritalin, and Vyvanse, are commonly subscribed for attention deficit disorders (ADD/ADHD). These drugs, however, have a high potential for abuse. These drugs act as intense uppers in higher doses and produce effects similar to that of methamphetamine and cocaine.

They are particularly popular on college campuses for their ability to greatly increase productivity in those without attention deficit disorders. Here we discuss the short-term effects of prescription amphetamines.

Hyperfocus

Prescription amphetamines are typically prescribed for those suffering from attention deficitA close up of an eye thats high disorders. Those who abuse these drugs will typically show intense concentration on particular tasks, such as cleaning, studying, etc.

Energy

Prescription amphetamines act as stimulants, which is where the slang “uppers” comes from. This, in turn, gives the user a burst of energy that typically lasts for approximately 3-4 hours. This is also one of the chief side effects that make the medication so addictive.

Insomnia

Prescription amphetamines, like all stimulants, are known to cause insomnia in users. Often times this specific side effect is desired by the user. For example, many college students will take the medication to stay awake for long periods of time to study and/or party.

Appetite suppression

Another side effect of prescription amphetamine is appetite suppression. Once again, this side effect is actually sought after by some of those who abuse prescription amphetamines, as the medication can cause serious weight loss in short periods of time.

Various Unwanted side-effects

Prescription amphetamines taken in high doses also produce several unwanted side effects. These include increased heart rate, tremors, profuse sweating, teeth clenching, dry mouth, compulsive skin picking, and mood swings.

Final Note

This article is intended for those considering a new way of life, free of the pain of drug and alcohol addiction. For more information on recovery and anyone seeking help with addiction and substance abuse problems, please call True Recovery at (844) 744-8783.